quarta-feira, 25 de fevereiro de 2015

Nigel Olsson's Drum Orchestra And Chorus - Nigel Olsson's Drum Orchestra And Chorus


















Nigel Olsson's Drum Orchestra And Chorus- Nigel Olsson's Drum Orchestra And Chorus - 1971

from Bilboard.com
Best-known as the drummer in Elton John's early-'70s backing band, Nigel Olsson was born February 10, 1949, in the small Cheshire (now Merseyside) town of Wallasey, England. As a teenager, he lived in Sunderland, where he sang lead in a group called the Fireflies and took up the drums when their regular drummer quit. At 17, he and good friend Mick Grabham successfully auditioned for the psychedelic pop band Plastic Penny, which released two albums from 1968-1969 and scored a hit with "Everything I Am" before disbanding. Olsson subsequently joined the Spencer Davis Group, which was reeling from the defection of frontman Stevie Winwood; the gig was short-lived as Davis broke up the band before the end of 1969, but Olsson met bassist Dee Murray, who would become his favorite rhythm section partner. Looking for work, Olsson filled the drum slot in Uriah Heep for part of the 1970 debut album Very 'eavy, Very 'umble, but soon left to concentrate on session work. He and Murray had been playing with Elton John on the young singer/songwriter's demos and they both joined his touring group in the spring of 1970. Olsson played on most of John's early-'70s classics, including Honky Chateau, Don't Shoot Me I'm Only the Piano Player, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, and Captain Fantastic & the Brown Dirt Cowboy. After the latter was released in the spring of 1975, John sought to shake up his backing band by replacing both Olsson and Murray.

Olsson had released a solo album in 1971 called Nigel Olsson's Drum Orchestra and Chorus and in the wake of his departure from John's group, he cut a self-titled album for John's Rocket label. Another eponymous effort followed for Columbia in 1978 and after a switch to Bang, Olsson scored a hit single in 1979 with "Dancin' Shoes" (from the album Nigel). 1980 saw the release of a follow-up LP, Changing Tides, as well as Olsson's membership in the Tremblers, a group uniting Peter Noone of Herman's Hermits fame with the Captain & Tennille's Daryl Dragon. Also that year, Olsson and Murray were invited to rejoin John's touring band, where they remained until 1984. Despite extensive session work throughout the '70s, Olsson was far less active in that area during the '80s, spending more time on writing and producing. In 1991, he and ex-John guitarist Davey Johnstone formed the group Warpipes, which released the album Holes in the Heavens the following year before breaking up when their label went bankrupt. Olsson spent much of the '90s away from music, aside from the occasional recording session, but in 2000 he rejoined John's band once again and the following year he released a sequel to his debut, Nigel Olsson's Drum Orchestra and Chorus Vol. 2: Move the Universe


01. Sunshine Looks Like Rain
02. I'm Coming Home
03. Nature's Way
04. Hummingbird
05. Some Sweet Day
06. I Can't Go Home Again
07. And I Know In My Heart
08. We've Got A Long Way To Go
09. Wierdhouse
10. China

Nigel Olsson - Vocals, Drums, Percussion
B.J. Cole - Guitar [Dobro], Steel Guitar
Mick Grabham - Guitar, Percussion
Caleb Quaye - Guitar, Keyboards
Dee Murray - Bass
Kathi MacDonald - Vocals
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Jeff Titmus, Stuart Epps - Percussion
Claudia Linnear, Doris Troy, Kathi McDonald, Liza Strike - Backing Vocal






This post was possible only through the help of my friend Brian. So, thanks again for your generosity.

+@320

sexta-feira, 20 de fevereiro de 2015

One For The Road - Memorial Concert Ronnie Lane

VA - One For The Road - Memorial Concert Ronnie Lane - 2014
Yours truly feels both elated and saddened, but which emotion should take precedence is another matter… This concert at the Royal Albert Hall was held in memory of Ronnie Lane, founding member of the Small Faces and the Faces. Lane tragically died in 1997, aged only 51 of pneumonia, in the final stages of his multiple sclerosis.

Thanks to Angel Air Records, the Memorial Concert, held at the Royal Albert Hall on 5th April 2004, is now available on DVD, offering a whopping three-and-a-half hours of superb entertainment delivered by artists such as Slim Chance (Lane’s band after The Faces split), Jones Gang, Steve Ellis, Mick Jones, Glen Matlock, Sam Brown (daughter of rock ‘n’ roller Joe Brown), Ronnie Wood, Paul Weller, Pete Townshend, Ocean Colour Scene, Steve Ellis, Steve Diggle, Midge Ure, Dennis Greaves, Deborah Bonham Band, Joe Marriott and Chris Farlowe.

Compere of the night was John Hellier, original Mod around town, and ‘Whapping Wharf Launderette Darling’, who greeted the many fans who had come from all over to assemble in the RAH. Hellier read out written tributes and apologies from Sir Paul McCartney and Eric Clapton, who were unable to participate due to conflicting schedules.

The evening covered the three main phases of Ronnie Lane’s career (Small Faces, Faces, and his solo work with Slim Chance and other artists), and each ‘phase’ was represented by various artists and bands who performed songs specific to each phase.


The CDs captures this and the general atmosphere brilliantly, while the sound quality is equally superb. Highlights – and there are many – include ‘Stone’, a Lane song about the evolution of conscience, performed by Pete Townshend and Slim Chance, and scorching guitar solos by Ronnie Wood. Sam Brown, a captivating singer by the way, missed her cue at one point as she “needed a wee” (obviously she thought of it as groovy), and ‘You’re So Rude’ cheekily delivered by Mick Jones and Glen Matlock. Midge Ure and Paul Weller also threw bona fide performances.

The concert featuring countless renditions of favourites such as ‘Itchycoo Park’, ‘Lazy Sunday’, ‘Cats Melody’, ‘Kuschty Rye’, ‘Maggie May’ and many more, also coughs up some surprises. Ronnie Lane’s brother Stan Lane was guest of honour at the concert, another guest was John Unwin, son of Professor Stanley Unwin, whose gobbledygook language had struck a big chord with Lane.

Perhaps the biggest surprise of the night was an appearance by soulful blues-rocker Chris Farlowe, who belted out ‘All Or Nothing’ together with the Jones Gang as the final number of the night.

01. I Can’t Make It – SMALL WORLD
02. I’ve Got Mine – SMALL WORLD
03. Don’t Burst My Bubble – SMALL WORLD
04. Every Little Bit Hurts – DEBORAH BONHAM BAND
05. Maybe I’m Amazed – DEBORAH BONHAM BAND
06. Rene – 17 BLACK with Mollie Marriott and Dean Rees
07. Lazy Sunday – 17 BLACK with Mollie Marriott and Dean Rees
08. Here Come The Nice – 17 BLACK with Steve Diggle
09. Hey Girl – 17 BLACK with Dennis Greaves
10. Whatcha Gonna Do About It – 17 BLACK with Dennis Greaves
11. Mad John – Midge Ure
12. My Mind’s Eye – Midge Ure
13. Wham Bam Thank you Man – OCEAN COLOUR SCENE
14. Done This One Before – OCEAN COLOUR SCENE
15. Song Of A Baker – OCEAN COLOUR SCENE
16. Cat’s Melody – SLIM CHANCE
17. Kuschty Rye – SLIM CHANCE
18. Anymore For Anymore – SLIM CHANCE with Chris Jagger
19. How Come - SLIM CHANCE with Chris Jagger
20. Debris – SLIM CHANCE with Glen Matlock and Mick Jones
21. You’re So Rude – SLIM CHANCE with Glen Matlock and Mick Jones
22. Stone – SLIM CHANCE with Pete Townshend
23. Harvest Home – SLIM CHANCE
24. The Poacher – SLIM CHANCE with Paul Weller
25. Spiritual Babe – SLIM CHANCE with Paul Weller
26. Lad’s Got Money – SLIM CHANCE with Sam Brown
27. One For The Road – SLIM CHANCE
28. Ooh La La – SLIM CHANCE with Paul Weller and Ronnie Wood
29. Ogdens Nut Gone Flake – JONES GANG
30. Maggie May – JONES GANG
31. Gypsy Lane – JONES GANG
32. Itchycoo Park – JONES GANG
33. Afterglow – JONES GANG with Steve Ellis
34. If You Think You’re Groovy – JONES GANG with Sam Brown
35. Tim Soldier – JONES GANG with Sam Brown
36. Heart To Hang On To – JONES GANG with Pete Townshend and Sam Brown
37. Had Me A Real Good Time – JONES GANG with Ronnie Wood
38. Stay With Me – JONES GANG with Ronnie Wood
39. All Or Nothing – JONES GANG with Chris Farlowe







+@192

domingo, 15 de fevereiro de 2015

Newtown Neurotics - Beggars Can Be Choosers


















Newtown Neurotics - Beggars Can Be Choosers - 1983

from AMG
This courageous trio from Harlow, Essex, has a great lesson to teach groups: how to infuse a striking mixture of sociopolitical awareness, brains, and down-to-earth, super-intelligent heart (on the sleeve, big time) into modern music. This is post-punk rock & roll with fun, energized appeal, with well-played ensemble work and a string of zippy, kinetic chord changes. One can dance, think, feel, and most of all be inspired to action by listening to such music, and leader Steve Drewett was one of the unsung giants of early-'80s indie Britain. Long before the amateurish riot-grrrl movement, big guy Drewett attacked sexism, gender roles, and domestic violence (from "No Respect": "No man is a 'whore' he invented the name/No man is a 'slut' he feels no shame." From "Agony": "When was the last time you saw a man cry on TV?"). Elsewhere, the remake of the Members' great 1978 single "Solitary Confinement" with Drewett's new words as "Living With Unemployment" might be the high watermark for '80s socialist-tinged, slice-of-life protest songs; it's heartfelt and real. And the competent punk-reggae of "Newtown People" is a scathing condemnation of their little town's bland, suffocating myopia. Albums like this make listeners proud instead of sickened to be a rock fan. There are only 1,250 copies pressed of the Dojo reissue of the Neurotics' first LP, originally issued by Razor U.K. in 1983. But 1,250 is better than nothing.



 

01. Wake Up
02. Mess
03. Get Up And Fight
04. No Respect
05. Agony
06. Newtown People
07. Does Anyone Know Where The March Is?
08. Life In Their Hands
09. My Death
10. Living With Unemployment
11. Blitzkrieg Bop (bonus)
12. Fools (bonus)
13. When I Need You (bonus)
14. Andy Is A Corporist  Mindless Version (Son Of Oi!) (bonus)


+@ 320 (Japanese Mini LP version - with 14 Tracks!!!!!!!)

sexta-feira, 13 de fevereiro de 2015

Steve Winwood - Winwood And Friends (repost)


















Steve Winwood - Winwood And Friends - 1972

from ecrater.com
As a solo artist, Steve Winwood is primarily associated with the highly polished blue-eyed soul-pop that made him a star in the '80s. Yet his turn as a slick, upscale mainstay of adult contemporary radio was simply the latest phase of a long and varied career, one that's seen the former teenage RB shouter move through jazz, psychedelia, blues-rock, and progressive rock. Possessed of a powerful, utterly distinctive voice, Winwood was also an excellent keyboardist who remained an in-demand session musician for most of his career, even while busy with high-profile projects. That background wasn't necessarily apparent on his solo records, which established a viable commercial formula that was tremendously effective as long as it was executed with commitment.



Read more HERE

Available on record in various forms, this is an essential insight into SW's early years. Most commonly available on "Steve Winwood and Friends" on the American Springboard label (catalogue # SPB-4040) or the French BYG label, long since out of print, but can be found in decent second-hand record shops and sometimes through the small ads in the Record Collector magazine. This is nice raw stuff with "Mojo" featuring SW and Spencer up at the mic for an all-star jam session including Sonny Boy Williamson, Long John Baldry, Eric Clapton, and Art Themen among others.


01. Dimples - Steve Winwood
02. Night Time is the Right Time - Steve Winwood
03. Mojo Working - Winwood/Williamson/Baldry
04. Jeff's Blues - Jeff Beck
05. Too Much Monkey Buisness - Clapton/Yardbirds
06. Highway 69 - Clapton/Yardbirds/Williamson
07. Early in the Morning - Baker/Bruce
08. The 219 - Long John Baldry



+@320

terça-feira, 10 de fevereiro de 2015

Cargoe - Twenty Ten


Cargoe - Twenty Ten - 2010

Often associated with the Power Pop genre given to Ardent Label Mates Big Star, Cargoe projected more of a stylized artistic nuance to their songwriting and performing, with harmonies exhibiting a strong American/Southern Roots cultural influence.

The band recorded their Album CARGOE with Terry Manning producing at, John Fry's Ardent Studios. They scored numerous Billboard and Cashbox Top 100 listings, and reviews from 1970 through 1973, along with major radio play of their first single “Feel Alright” and follow-up “I Love You Anyway”. The band’s studio LP CARGOE was even featured, with Isaac Hayes Shaft, which won an Academy Award/Oscar that year for Best Original Song, in a Special Edition section of Billboard’s June 3, 1972 “The Deck is STAX” promotion.

The band began a west coast tour the summer of 1972, but was caught up in the distribution and bankruptcy label problems at Stax/Volt, who distributed the album and owned the masters. Distribution was sold to Columbia Records who failed to include Cargoe in their catalog, which meant that listeners who heard the hit couldn't actually buy the record. “Feel Alright” and their debut CARGOE LP fell off the charts instantly.

The same label troubles caused both Cargoe and Big Star to disband within a short time. Big Star went on to become one of the most beloved and influential bands of the entire decade, while Cargoe pretty much disappeared out of the popular memory.
Ardent Records contracts for distribution with Stax/Volt gave Stax ownership of the master tapes. When Stax went bankrupt in the mid-'70s, ownership of the masters eventually wound up in the hands of Fantasy Records Saul Zaentz, and no one's been able to get the tapes for domestic release.

It's certainly worth noting that after nearly 40 years of producing and engineering countless hit records including ZZ Top, Led Zeppelin, George Thorogood, Celine Dion, Björk, Lenny Kravitz, Mariah Carey, Shania Twain, and many others, Terry Manning to this day regards Cargoe as “the great record he helped make that no one ever discovered”

READ THE STORY OF CARGOE HERE

01. Who Do You Think
02. Take Me Out Tonight
03. Rut
04. Stay
05. Games
06. Seasons
07. Sizzlin'
08. It Won't Be Wrong
09. Believe In Me
10. Together
11. Hurry Up & Wait!
12. Sailing
13. I Don't Want To Lose
14. Do It!

YEARS! 






+@192