sábado, 22 de abril de 2017

Harvey Mandel - Snake Pit


















Harvey Mandel - Snake Pit - 2016

Chicago-based guitarist Harvey Mandel’s first appearance on record was in 1966, on Stand Back! Here Comes Charley Musselwhite’s Southside Band. Over the next few years he played live with a number of other blues legends, including Muddy Waters and Otis Rush, and appeared on recordings by Canned Heat and John Mayall, his long, searing guitar lines earning him the nickname “the Snake.” When the Heat appeared at Woodstock in 1969, Mandel was their lead guitarist. In 1974, when Mick Taylor left the Rolling Stones, Mandel auditioned for his slot, and played in “Hot Stuff” and “Memory Motel,” from the Stones’ Black and Blue (1976).

As even that brief glimpse of his résumé shows, Mandel should be better known. His new album, Snake Pit, matches the standard he’s set with his many solo albums since 1968, and shows his formidable skills undiminished. Mandel recorded the album at Fantasy Studios, in Berkeley, with four young Chicago musicians, to whom he introduced his song ideas via demos he’d recorded on his Phones.

Mandel sounds confident and strong in the title track, with drummer Ryan Jewell and bassist Anton Hatwich laying down a firm foundation behind his tastefully flashy guitar. Ben Boye plays understated electric piano, then steps up for a nicely constructed solo. “Snake Pit” contains hints of blues, funk, and jazz that Mandel handles easily but with burning conviction, and even at a length of 5:27, “Snake Pit” never loses steam or stoops to cliché.


01. Snake Pit
02. Space Monkeys
03. NightinGail
04. Baby Batter
05. JackHammer
06. Buckaroo
07. Before Six
08. Ode to B.B.

Harvey Mandel - Guitar
Brian J. Sulpizio - Rhythm Guitar
Ben Boye - Keyboard
Anton Hatwich - Bass
Ryan Jewell - Drums
Jose Najera - Percussion






+@320 😄😄😄😄😄

terça-feira, 18 de abril de 2017

Peter Wolf - A Cure For Loneliness

















 
Peter Wolf - A Cure For Loneliness  - 2016

With over ten solo albums, Peter Wolf's music remains rooted in American music traditions -- rock, blues, R&B, country. That said, he delivers them with more complexity and nuance than in his role as frontman for the J. Geils Band.

A Cure for Loneliness reassembles members of his longtime backing band the Midnight Travelers: guitarists Duke Levine and Kevin Barry, and bassist Marty Ballou -- augmented by drummer Shawn Pelton and keyboardist and co-producer Kenny White. Larry Campbell, Teresa Williams, and others appear in supporting roles. Wolf wrote or co-wrote all but three songs here. The material builds on the foundation laid on 2010's Midnight Souvenirs. The songs are more often than not sad, but they're never downers. Wolf's protagonists don't ask for pity or empathy. This is borne out in the covers too: Moe Bandy's honky tonk waltz "It Was Always So Easy (To Find an Unhappy Woman)" and the 1959 doo wop hit "Tragedy".

01. Rolling On
02. It Was Always So Easy (To Find An Unhappy Woman)
03. Peace Of Mind
04. How Do You Know
05. Fun For Awhile
06. Wastin' Time (Live)
07. Some Other Time, Some Other Place
08. It's Raining
09. Love Stinks (Live)
10. Mr. Mistake
11. Tragedy
12. Stranger







+@192 😀😀😀

sábado, 15 de abril de 2017

Stepson - The Lost Tapes 1972-1974 (Re-Post)


















Stepson - The Lost Tapes 1972-1974 - 2013

About forty years in the making, and finally the world has the second Stepson album! Utilizing tapes preserved by drummer Len Fagan then transferred to digital and mastered by bassist Bruce Hauser, this fine collection of twelve songs is as close as the world will ever get to a real second Stepson album. 

Some is raw, some is embryonic, but it’s all prime stuff for fans to savor, reflecting the band’s “devil may care” attitude and rock ’n’ roll lifestyle. And just in case you don’t believe that the band liked to party, consider that the exact recording dates (and even some locations) have long been forgotten. 

To borrow an old adage: If you can remember Stepson, you weren’t there. Kicking off with a crunching riff by guitarist Joey Newman, ‘Danger Zone’ is the heaviest track Stepson ever cut, replete with an ominous atmosphere reflecting the seedy side of their native Los Angeles; ‘Streets of Alameda’ (1974) is an ode to vocalist Jeff Hawks’ hometown, featuring a liquor store holdup and a stolen Lincoln used as the getaway car. ‘Flesh & Blood’ is the only track on here that got an official release, albeit by ex-Smith belter Gayle McCormick as the title track to her second solo album, released by Decca in 1972. This version showcases the riff in full glory. And if you don’t believe that this riff is strong, consider that The Tonight Show band played it for approximately two weeks in 1976, prompting Fagan to confront “author” Don Menza, who coincidentally did the Flesh & Blood album’s horn charts and was now claiming credit for the song under the title ‘Instant Heart.’ The song disappeared from late night TV show shortly thereafter. ‘Bad Situation,’ the only other 1974 track, describes the band’s predicament that year: a track that should have propelled them to the big time, but instead bounced off a brick wall like a tennis ball. The maracas and funkified quasi-Bo Diddley groove hint at Stepson’s growth and what might have been.

01. Danger Zone
02. Streets of Alameda
03. Can’t Help Myself
04. Flesh & Blood
05. S-H-A-K-E
06. Don’t Say Goodbye (Say Goodnight)
07. Midnight Creep
08. Mississippi Dirt Road
09. Rock’d To My Very Soul
10. Bad Situation
11. The Tears You Cried (Ain’t Never Gonna Buy)
12. Legalize It


Joey Newman- Guitar, Vocals
Jeff Hawks - Lead vocals
Len Fagan - Drums
Bruce Hauser - Bass, Vocals




+@320